The Great Clean Out of 2017.

kitchen

Dear friends,

One of my favorite memories about my unconventional father is his “honor garage sales.” Although I spent most of my life separated from my father, I lived with him for two full years in college. (It was a little weird; after all those years apart we were suddenly adult roommates.) Bob loved money and loved cutting a deal, but he didn’t much care for the logistics and customer relations aspects of hosting a garage sale. So he tagged all his items and displayed them in the front yard with a sign describing the rules of his garage sale. (“Take your item and leave your money in the envelope in the mailbox.”) Then he drove to the neighborhood bar where he threw back a few and waited out the crowd. Several hours later, Bob came home to an envelope full of money and a mostly cleared yard. What a deal!

I’ve started off 2017 with a New Year’s Resolution to purge my life of excess baggage.  My approach is a little different than Bob’s but it works for me. I made an extensive list of every “space” in my home to be purged, cleaned and/or reorganized. I mentally gave myself a full year to do the job, but I was exceptionally industrious in January and made a ton of progress. I purposefully avoided a list that said “Clean Den” because I knew it would be overwhelming. The key to success, I figured, was the satisfaction of seeing regular check marks indicating progress on my list.

In that spirit, my list says things like “De-clutter nightstands.” “Purge jewelry drawer.” “Tackle the den bookshelves.” You know . . . bite-size, manageable chunks. So far, I’ve tackled my dish pantry (it took an entire day); my dining room buffet; every single drawer and cabinet in my kitchen (all 39 of them), including the kitchen counter tops, coffee stand, and kitchen appliance cart; hung a new light fixture in the kitchen (okay, Mr. Mom did that, but I helped); repainted the fireplace mantle and screen; purged and reorganized the front coat closet; Mr. Mom’s closet; the mud room (really a glorified alcove); the master bathroom sink cabinet; every table surface and wall in the living room; and the half bath counter top. I’ve hauled too many car loads to count of purged possessions to a local charity resale store. And I’ve still got a long ways to go.

Including a basement that’s not even on the list because it’s too overwhelming.

But hey, it’s only February, right? And you ought to see my house. It really is looking so good.

I’m not sure that any woman who calls herself Magpie and has an entire pantry of dishes (on top of all the dishes in her large kitchen) can ever claim to be a minimalist. But, lordy, you ought to see how de-cluttered my house is looking. There are tables and counter tops and walls with plenty of open space. The drawers are organized. There are EMPTY drawers! (Okay, there’s one empty drawer in my buffet, but still. It’s EMPTY!) I actually gave away one bag of table linens and several boxes of dishes, my most treasured collections.

And I feel so good about my newly airy 2500 square feet of dwelling space!

Actually, I feel guilty. A little. Because no good deed goes unpunished in the Magpie psyche, I feel bad for living in such a big house and having spent money over the years on so many possessions I’m now giving away. But I read this article earlier this week and decided to “own my mistakes” and “let go.” And even Mr. Mom has given me an important affirmation. A couple of weeks ago he said “Things are really looking good honey. The key, I think, now is to maintain it. Quit bringing stuff home.”

No penance for past sins. Just forward progress. He’s a gem of a guy, ain’t he?

And I really feel like I’ve turned the corner emotionally. I amused my friends when I declared I was going to pare a little each year until five years from my death I would live in a very small space and be free of possessions. They are anxious to know how I’m going to know when I’m five years from death. But I figure barring a tragic accident or very sudden illness, I’ll know. And I’ll trim accordingly because I’m committed to not leaving a trail of possessions for my loved ones to deal with. It’s not what defines me, much as I’ve allowed it to as reflected in my self-selected nickname.

It’s worth mentioning my friend and colleague died suddenly two weeks ago at age 59. I absolutely adore his wife and our circle of friends’ shared grief has been a bit of a wake-up call. Life is short. Hug your people. Tell them you love them every day. Get your shit in order and focus on love and kindness, not things. I hear the message, dear universe.

I’m not only cleaning out the physical clutter, I’m sweeping away the emotional detritus. Or trying to, anyway. And I’m telling everyone I care about in every way I know how — I love you!

And there’s a minimalist quality to those three simple words that are fitting, don’t you think?

With gratitude {for the energy and inspiration to clean, for the incredible luxury of worldly goods I can share with others, for a large circle of peeps to love, for today’s breath},

Joan, who thinks Bob almost had it just right and is seriously contemplating a “charity garage sale” where everything is free, first come, first served, and wonders what you think about her crackpot idea

 

 

 

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A metaphor for 2014.

Dear friends,

metaphor

I don’t want anyone to feel sorry for me or anything, but I do want to state for the record that 2014 has kicked my butt in only nine short days.

If I were a dog, I’d be dirty, wet, and three-legged.

I had a wonderful, peaceful, joyous Christmas so I can’t say for sure why the new year has gotten off to such an inauspicious start.

Well . . . I can offer one very big reason: I’m detoxing. I decided on Dec. 30 to give up caffeine even though I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. I’ve had what I will politely call a headache ever since.

For the first 24 hours I felt fine. I even bragged about how fine I was. Then the apocolyptic headache set in on day two.

For the next five days, my Headache Threat Level was: Holy *&%$. (Don’t really know how to interpret Holy *&%$? Let me just say that on New Year’s Eve, I took a pharmaceutical cocktail that would have rendered most people comatose and went to bed at 6:30 pm. only to wake up a few hours later at the same Headache Threat Level.)

Then for three more days my Headache Threat Level was: Good Lord Caffeine is Poison.

Today — day nine of my New Year’s resolution — my Headache Threat Level is: I’m Really Annoyed and Tired and I Want to Cry.

Oddly enough, my caffeine detox has coincided with a virulent strain of insomnia. I haven’t slept past 2:30 am in a week. Sleepless and decaffeinated is not the path to a good life. Or so it seems on day nine of the new year.

By the way, back when my Headache Threat Level was Holy *&%$, I concluded cold turkey was a poor strategy and decided to drink a cup of coffee. I took two drinks and thought it tasted terrible. Gag-reflex terrible. That’s when I decided caffeine really is poison, my body must be trying to tell me something, and I encouraged myself to hang in there despite the winching pain.

During the decaffeinated, sleepless stupor we’ll call 2014, a few other choice developments have occurred. Like a winter storm that left us with sub-zero temps and a foot of snow. Like a flood in my office.

Like three lost breakfasts in a row.

You see, because of the winter storm and poor road conditions, Mr. Mom has been driving me to work every morning. And for the last three mornings, I’ve taken my breakfast to work with me in a plastic baggy. Only I haven’t enjoyed said breakfasts because somewhere between the curb where Mr. Mom drops me off, and my office some 50 feet away, my breakfast has disappeared.

I figured I had managed to leave my baggies in Mr. Mom’s truck each morning. However, I found that explanation odd because it would have been just like him to text me something like “Hey, you left your breakfast in my truck this morning. Want me to save it for you?” I meant to ask him about it each evening but my fluctuating Headache Threat Level destroyed my memory.

Anyway, I’m still relying on kind drivers to shuttle me around town and when Kate and Parker dropped me off after taking me to lunch today, I caught a glimpse of something odd buried in the snow and slush by the curb.

It was yesterday’s breakfast.

(See photo above. For the record, that’s an orange and a boiled egg.)

There was no sign of the other two breakfasts, but I’m sure we’ll find them after the thaw.

That muddy, icy bag of mangled breakfast is a perfect metaphor for my 2014. I think the universe wanted me to see it. For a much-needed laugh, I suppose.

Or as a reminder that even when my breakfast is mangled, my coffee cup is empty, and my office carpet is wet, my friends and family keep me trucking.

With gratitude {for the ability to muster gratitude at this point},

Joan, who has nowhere to go but up in 2014

The Gratitude Project: a new year’s resolution.

Dear Friends,

2011 was a trying year.

Sometimes I think they all are. I mean, who looks back on any given year and says “Wow! I really nailed that one!” ? I suppose some people do — Warren Buffett, maybe. But for those of us who are slogging through this earthly life without benefit of vast resources or magical powers, our years bring us both highs and lows, blessings and challenges, and I believe we are luckier than most if we can look back and surmise a year was filled with more good than bad.

Take my 2011, for example. To one observer, my year could be considered exciting, adventurous, and brimming with new opportunities. Another might say it was difficult, discombobulated, and frightening. Truth is, it was both. Life has an inherent duality that way. “Grandma” (played by Helen Shaw) in the movie Parenthood summed it up best:

You know, when I was nineteen, Grandpa took me on a roller coaster. Up, down, up, down. Oh, what a ride! I always wanted to go again. You know, it was just so interesting to me that a ride could make me so frightened, so scared, so sick, so excited, and so thrilled all together! Some didn’t like it. They went on the merry-go-round. That just goes around. Nothing. I like the roller coaster. You get more out of it.

Like every other year of my life, 2011 had some peaks and some valleys. But as it drew to a close and I looked back on the sum of it, I found myself discontented and more melancholy than usual. “It isn’t supposed to be this way,” I thought to myself. “This was my big year!”* But as I reflected further, I realized that every good thing is imbued with a little bad; and every bad thing has an element of good. Why did I possibly think 2011 would be any different?

So, I vowed to make 2012 a year of gratitude. Myriad blessings float through my life every day. Like specks of dust, many of them are invisible unless viewed in a prism of bright sunlight. I started this blog to shine the light on all the specks of joy and love and beauty and grace floating around my life that might otherwise go unnoticed. I’m going to train my gratitude muscles, so to speak; in doing so, I hope to avoid the mental trap that convinces us perfection — something better — is just around the corner. Life — the life we hold in our hands now, which is the only life we really have — is messy  and imperfect and uncertain. But that doesn’t make it unsatisfactory . . . as long as we cultivate gratitude.

Gratitude is life’s great elixir. Drink deeply, folks. I invite you to  join me on this journey of appreciation for all that we are and all that we share. Leave me a comment if anything I write resonates with you. Or set me straight if you disagree.  Together, our gratitude project might be just what the doctor ordered.

With gratitude {for another year},

Joan

* For the back story on my big year, click here.