Block by block.

Dear friends,

quilt

I enjoyed a quiet day alone yesterday. Kate went to a wedding while Mr. Mom and Parker took their dirt-bikes to a wilderness area for an afternoon ride.  So I took advantage of a long stretch of time to nearly finish Kate’s quilt top.

I still have some ric-rac and two borders to put around the blocks, but I’m awfully close. I just might finish it this weekend. Then all I have to do is to piece the backing before shipping it off to be quilted. I took this photo as daylight was fading so you can’t really see the fabrics very well. It looks better in person — bright and colorful but not garish. When it’s all finished, I’ll take photos in proper light so you can see the subtleties of the prints.

I chose this quilt pattern because it’s a little rustic and seems old-fashioned to me. While I’ve always appreciated the handiwork required of intricate and artistic quilts, my favorites have always leaned toward the folk art variety — something you  might have seen 70 years ago on an iron bed in a cabin in the woods. I like the contrast of the rustic pattern with the bright and modern fabrics I selected, especially since my girl is a big fan of bright colors. I think it will look terrific in her college apartment next fall.

You don’t have to look very close to notice my many mistakes. A friend’s mother is an expert quilter — expert, as in she’s had several quilts selected for the prestigious Paducah show. She’s been giving me encouragement and she recently told me every quilt has a “God” block — that one block in a quilt that’s imperfect. (Some quilters call it the “humility” block because when you leave it in, it shows your humility before God.)

That made me laugh when I heard it because I was pretty sure I would be making about 42 God blocks, which makes for one divine quilt.

With gratitude {for the light at the end of the tunnel on my first big sewing project},

Joan, who’s already itching to move on to quilt #2, a project she is excited to reveal soon

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Comments

  1. I’m with you, I appreciate the artistry in the more modern quilting techniques, but it is the old fashioned quilt styles that grab my heartstrings every time. As appreciated as this quilt will be by your sweet Kate as a student, I can only imagine how lovely it will be in her eyes years (and years) from now as she is reminded by every glance how much love it represents between a girl and her Momma. You haven’t only made a quilt, you’ve created a legacy piece. Divine, indeed.

  2. I love the brightness of this quilt. It has a very happy feel about it. Just perfect as a leaving home quilt for your daughter.:)

  3. My mother always said that there had to be at least one mistake in any project. Only the gods are allowed to be perfect, and trying for perfection would anger them and curse the person who received the quilt. This was from an extremely Christian woman, by the way!

  4. It’s beautiful and cheerful and made with love.

  5. A remarkable maiden voyage, Joan-Marie.

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